Giant Pothole

Giant Pothole

Most potholes come in two ways. First, the underlying soluble rocks dissolve by the water leaking from the soil, and the natural voids in the rock expand and fill with the soil above them. As the groundwater continues to dissolve the rock, the soil disappears and leaves behind the slopes with low slope and low depth. When the neighboring potholes join, they form a larger, irregular, closed network of depressions called dissolution valleys. Potholes are also formed in the form of a steep sided crater as a result of the collapse of a cave ceiling. Potholes formed in this way are a serious danger, especially in regions where the population is high. [2nd] Other conditions are necessary for the formation of potholes other than the presence of karstic areas. There should be two basins with different groundwater levels. A higher threshold should separate these areas. Groundwater of basins should flow below this threshold. All these conditions come together in the Obruk plateau. The Obruk plateau is in the threshold position between the Tuz Gölü basin and the Konya plain. The higher Konya groundwater shows underground flow from the bottom of the plateau towards the Tuz Gölü basin. The melting created by this flow is the main reason for the formation of current sinkholes. Other than these reasons, local fault lines also contribute to sinkhole formation. The fault located in the southwest of the Salt Lake is the cause of the .



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